Terry Downes Dies at the Age of 81

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Reports coming from Britain on Sunday confirmed that Terry Downes had died. This is the quick-witted middleweight champion of boxing who was also known by the nickname Paddington Express. While he made a name for himself in boxing, he managed to make most of his wealth outside the sport. He is said to have made his wealth by investing in legal betting shops. At the same time, he made most of his wealth as an actor. The reports confirmed that he died on 6th October at the age of 81 years. His death was confirmed by Barbara Downes, his wife, who said that he succumbed to kidney failure. Terry Downes had a record of 35 wins and nine defeats. This is the reason why he was referred to as a thorough British fighter. For starters, he managed to win the British middleweight championship twice. Some of his high profile losses came when he was fighting Joey Giardello from Brooklyn and Sugar Ray Robinson. He was described as a crowd pleaser by Barry Hearn. Mr. Hearn further said that whenever he fought in London, the crowd would go wild. He often called his nose the perishin hooter and it’s the part of the body that suffered most in his boxing career.

After he left boxing, it’s estimated that he required plastic surgery and approximately 364 stitches to ensure that his face returned to normal. Besides the fame that came with being a boxer, the man was also famous for his ownership in Sam Burns betting shops. Sam Burns used to be his manager. While the betting shops were legalized by the British government in 1961, he decided to invest close to $728,000 in these ventures. He also downplayed suggestions that he would retire from boxing in 1961. He said that he was too young to retire. As a result, he fought Rudolph Nehring the same year but lost. He owned the betting shops alongside his manager for a period of 10 years before he decided to sell them to William Hill bookmaking chain in 1970. Terry Downes was born as Terence Richard Downes to a mechanic father and a house maker mother. He owed his career to his father who taught him some basic boxing skills as a child. He once told the Telegraph that every day was a fight day for him. When he moved to the United States, he enlisted as a US Marine.

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